The IACP Interest Sections let you connect with other professionals working in your field. The sections provide quarterly newsletters, monthly online hang-outs, and occasional events throughout the year.

 


Cooking Schools and Teachers

Section Leadership: 

IACP members, please connect via the IACP Facebook page or via Michele Redmond’s email

Leader: Michele Redmond | Michele@thetasteworkshop.com
Newsletter Editor: Mary Margaret Chappell | mmchappell@me.com

Newsletters: 

Spring 2019 Cooking Schools and Teachers Newsletter

Letter from the Chair

No matter what type of food and culinary work IACP members are engaged in, encouraging people to be curious about food and to cook with more ease and joy is a shared trait. Whether your work involves writing, recipes, media, events, products or other many ways to make food your business, teaching about food and cooking is involved.

I hear from people all the time that they either feel cooking istime consumingand difficult or I hear aspirational stories of individuals, couples or families who’ve figure out ways to make cooking a simple, fun and affordable event. Both these scenarios are opportunities for IACP members to do work that unites people and helps improves their health and wellbeing.

Regardless of how you reach people, at some point teaching people about food and about cooking is either central to what you do or connected to it. Sheila Crye shares how Marcia Smart successfully runs her home-kitchen cooking school in San Francisco and Mary Margaret Chappell offers her perspective on how to be a better teacher after her experience taking a galette class in France.

For the IACP conference in Santa Fe, the Cooking Schools and Teachers Section will organize a 60-minute meeting on Friday night. Sheila Crye has offered to run the event in my place as I’m speaking at a conference and can’t attend. More information on the time and location will be shared via the Facebook page, so please look out for that.

Cheers,
Michele

Michele Redmond speaks, writes and teaches on topics of culinary nutrition, neurogastronomy and creating positive food cultures to improve wellbeing via http://www.thetasteworkshop.com/

How to Run Cooking Classes from Your Home Kitchen:
Smart in the Kitchen, Houston, TX​

By Sheila Crye
Marcia Smart, a graduate of Tante Marie’s Cooking School in San Francisco, teaches hands-on cooking classes from her home kitchen. Her classes focus on helping home cooks get easy, mostly healthy, weeknight meals on the table. Some students are beginners, others are experienced home cooks.

Many times, she opens class with a demonstration on how to dice an onion. Most classes prepare six recipes, so pairs of students each make one dish. When they sit down for the meal, they discuss what they made, what they learned and any surprises.

Marcia sits down and eats with her students. She loves inviting people into her home and showing them that entertaining can be less fussy and formal.

Nitty Gritty Business Matters

Marcia handles all the registrations and cancellations. Her following was built through word of mouth and asking people to sign up for newsletter emails at every opportunity. She started out years ago by just emailing a group of about 40 people. Eventually the email list got too long, and she switched to MailChimp.

She sends out a monthly email newsletter and usually receives a strong immediate response. She responds to the first 12 people to let them know they are “in,” and they send her their payment to reserve their spot. Usually there are three or four people on the waitlist. If the waitlist is big enough, she adds a second class with the same menu.

Twelve students are the ideal size for her classes, which run from 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. She charges $100 per person for her home-based classes, and $125 per person, if she teaches from others’ homes. There is a 10-person minimum for a class to go forward. Because she has many repeat clients, most classes offer a different menu.

Marcia recommends checking LegalZoom.com when setting up your home-based cooking school. She has an umbrella insurance policy.

While she does not have an assistant during class, she does use a part-time assistant for business-related tasks a couple times a month. She employs a helper to clean before class, and she also comes after class to clean up the dishes.

Marcia bought a set of dishes and silverware from Ikea for classes and uses paper napkins. She puts out a pitcher of water and sparkling water during class.

“My advice for prospective home-based cooking teachers is to just do it,” says Marcia, “You learn by doing, and the more experience you gain from teaching, the more confident you will become. If you’re just starting out and you’ve never taught cooking classes, invite friends for a free class. Treat it just as you would a regular class and ask for feedback afterwards.”

Sheila Crye CCP loves her work teaching cooking skills and nutritional knowledge to children, youth, adults, and seniors in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Back to School: Lessons Learned from Taking a Cooking Course

By Mary Margaret Chappell
‘But don’t you know how to do that already?’

That’s what everyone asked me when I signed up for a professional crêpe-making class. After 18 years of living in Brittany, home of the French crêpe, I did—sort of. Sure, I could make sweet crêpes in a nonstick frying pan for friends or kids. But those large things slathered in Nutella that they sell on Parisian street corners and the savory buckwheat galettes that Brittany is famous for? Not so much.

The 2-week course got me there (though I still need lots of practice!). It also taught me a lot about what it’s really like to be a student in a cooking class, an experience that has radically changed the way I teach.

Encourage, encourage, encourage!
I had no idea how insecure I was going to be as a student! I found myself fretting I’d do something stupid and that my errors would reflect on me. The words of encouragement the instructors gave me – Nice job! See, you’ve got it now! Beautiful!—were a balm to my anxious-to-please soul.
I realized that often when I’m teaching, I’m so busy directing, correcting, and making sure no kitchen disaster comes to pass (like someone letting the milk boil over) that I don’t always think about the encouragement that helps bolster students’ confidence in the kitchen.

Review and repeat.
Buckwheat crêpe batter has three ingredients: Buckwheat flour, water, and salt. You’d think the class could remember the quantities and procedure pretty easily, right? Wrong. Each time we made our batters, there was a flurry of hushed whispers—How much water again? Is it 20 or 30 grams of salt? Heck, I nearly ruined my own batter one day by adding all the water at once (it should be added in two stages).
It occurred to me that too often, I only repeat a technique explanation if I’m asked a question. My goal now: Make a conscious effort to incorporate reviews into the class to avoid questions, confusion, and mistakes.

Don’t let the squeaky wheel get all the grease.
One woman in my class always needed help with this, she didn’t understand that, she wanted to try this even though it wasn’t in the curriculum…and ended up monopolizing the instructor’s time. (There’s always one, isn’t there?) At first, I just put up with it. Then I started to get annoyed with her—and with the instructor. While he was responding to all her requests, he wasn’t helping me or the others. And we all needed—and deserved—his assistance, too. From that moment on, I vowed to shut down that type of behavior sooner in my own classes and make sure everyone gets equal attention. It’s not always easy, but I now know what a difference it can make to a student’s (my!) overall experience.

Mary Margaret Chappell has been living, cooking, writing, developing recipes and teaching from her kitchen in Cancale, France (on the English Channel in Brittany) since 2007. Her ongoing love affair with the buckwheat galettes from her adopted home led her to present a paper on the history of buckwheat in Brittany at the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery in 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

Spring 2017
Winter 2017
Winter 2016
Summer 2016
Spring 2016
Summer 2015

Section Activities:

Please email Nancy Waldeck at nwaldeck@tasteandsavor.com to RSVP for a call. Calls are limited to current IACP members only.

 

Get Involved: 

Please contact section leader Nancy Waldeck at nwaldeck@tasteandsavor.com to learn how to get involved.


Digital Media

Section Leadership:

Section Leader: Sean Timberlake | sean@seantimberlake.com 
Section Co-Leader: Ashley Carufel | arcarufel@pbs.org
Newsletter Editor: Jane Bonnaci | heritagecook@comcast.net

Newsletters:

Spring 2017
Fall 2016
Spring 2016
Fall 2015

Section Activities:

Coming soon…

 

Get Involved:

Please contact Annelies Zijderveld at anneliesz@gmail.com to learn how to get involved.


Food Writers, Editors, and Publishers

Section Leadership:

Section Leader: Lisa Howard |lisa@theculturedcook.com
Section Co-Leader: Susi Seguret | sgseguret@gmail.com
Newsletter Co-Editor: Carrie Boyd | carrieelizabethboyd@gmail.com
Newsletter Co-Editor: Nandita Godbole | currycravings@gmail.com
Newsletter Co-Editor: Lesley Téllez | lesley.tellez@gmail.com
Newsletter Copy Editor: Suzanne Fass |

Newsletters:

Spring 2017
Winter 2017
Summer 2016

 

Section Activities:

The FWEP section meets monthly on Tuesdays for a Google Hangout discussion session. These sessions focus on various topics, from pitching strategies, to honing your writing niche, to marketing yourself, and it’s a great way to meet folks working in the field. Email Lisa Howard at lisa@theculturedcook.com to grab a spot on the next call. Calls are limited to 10 spots, so make sure to RSVP.

Get Involved:

Please contact Lisa Howard at lisa@theculturedcook.com and Susi Seguret at sgseguret@gmail.com to learn how to get involved.


Food Photographers and Stylists

Section Leadership: 

Section Leader: Jeffrey Martin|jeff@jeffreymartinfoodstylist.com
Section Co-Leader: Rhonda Adkins |thekitchenwitchblog@gmail.com
Newsletter Chair: Patrick Evans-Hylton |patrickevanshylton@gmail.com
Newsletter Board Member: Laura Devries |laura@thischefstyles.com
Newsletter Board Member: Emily Anstadt | emanstadt@gmail.com
Social Media Co-Chair: Jenn de la Vega |randwiches@gmail.com

Newsletters: 

Fall 2016
Summer 2016
Spring 2015

 

Section Activities:

Coming soon…

Get Involved: 

To get involved, please contact Jeffrey Martin at jeff@jeffreymartinfoodstylist.com.


Youth Culinary Initiative

Section Leadership:

Section Leader: Jill Conklin | jillpconklin@gmail.com
Section Co-Leader: Open

Newsletters:

Coming soon…

Section Activities:

Coming soon…

Get Involved:

The Youth Culinary Initiative Interest Section is currently seeking volunteers! Please email Jill Conklin at jillpconklin@gmail.com to learn how you can get involved.